Janina Fisher Excerpts Regarding the Multi-Conscious Parts Approach for Trauma Recovery.


{These are all direct quotes from Janina Fisher's incredible 2017 book titled "Healing the Fragmented Selves of Trauma Survivors: Overcoming Internal Self-Alienation."}

"Without efforts to repair emotional ruptures, bring solace to parts in distress, & combat self-alienation & self-loathing with internal attachment bonding, traumatized clients cannot feel whole, safe, & welcome." {Janina Fisher, Healing the Fragmented Selves of Trauma Survivors: Overcoming Internal Self-Alienation, page 213.}

"Touching moments of heart-to-heart connection between a small child part & a compassionate adult self are important, but to facilitate the shift from internal alienation to earned secure attachment is '10% inspiration & 90% perspiration,' as the saying goes. Repetition over & over again of the same steps (connecting to a part, creating moments of repair & attunement, & deepening the bond between child & adult selves) & then integrating the experience by evoking it again & again are the most important ingredients in lasting change. In the 1980's & 1990's, we believed that the intensity of the emotional experience would result in a transformative shift. Now, informed by research from the neuroscience world, we know that neural plasticity or actual change in the brain is best facilitated by intensive repetition of new patterns of action & reaction (Schwartz & Begley, 2002)." {Janina Fisher, Healing the Fragmented Selves of Trauma Survivors: Overcoming Internal Self-Alienation, page 213.}

"We end the session with a discussion of 'parenting tips,' ways that Carl could remind himself that this boy, like any child, needs to feel held in the mind of the caregiver, to feel seen or 'recognized' (Benjamin, 1994), to have his feelings noticed & comforted, validated, & regulated. I offer him a menu of ideas: starting each day by saying 'good morning' to the little boy; relating to him 'face to face' by putting out a picture of himself at the age he senses the little boy to be; going to a toy store to find a stuffed animal for him base on what toy lights up his eyes or keeps drawing his attention; carrying with him a small object (a stone or tiny toy animal, for example) that symbolizes the child as a way of holding him close, imaginatively tucking the child in at night as a way of making sure he feels safe." {Janina Fisher, Healing the Fragmented Selves of Trauma Survivors: Overcoming Internal Self-Alienation, page 212-213.} #RaisingMosaics #DissociativeIdentityMovement